Premed Myths 3

Hello everyone!

It’s been awhile and I’ve been working hard in both my personal and professional life. I’ve been doing research, talking to students, mentoring premeds and medical students. I am dedicating this post to some premed myths about admissions.

Premed Myths:

1. If I don’t have a perfect MCAT score or GPA then I won’t get into medical school. Similarly, if others don’t they don’t deserve to be there either.

This is patently false with a caveat. You need a strong GPA, whether in college, post bac (formal or informal) in upper division biological or hard sciences. This establishes ability to complete the rigors of science education in medical school. You also need a strong MCAT score: at least 70th percentile or above to get in the door. But we must remember you are more than just a score! Your preparation, your years of researching, volunteering, shadowing, community service etc. that demonstrate YOUR why for medicine are the things that give context to the store. The ad coms do not look at these numbers without the context of who you are, your story and your motivation. If those things are weak, numbers won’t help you. But- if you have a strong motivation for medicine that is demonstrated clearly through experiences and your grades and MCATs meet certain thresholds, then you could get the chance to convince the committee that you are a great candidate by gaining an interview.

As for others worthiness of being there – each person has a unique story. Don’t judge or look down on your fellow premeds. They will become your colleagues. You may need them one day.

2. Certain ethnicities or underrepresented minority groups have lower scores and unfairly get in to medical school.

I had to touch on this eventually because I clearly recall dealing with this as a premed on SDN (Student Doctor Network). I felt as if being African American, Latino or other minority was considered dirty, you were a cheater and you had to have a low GPA. You were seen as keeping all the worthy White and Asian students from getting into school. Some people said as much directly. This is patently false as well. If you have questions- I can attach the AAMC admissions numbers by race. The sad reality for African American students is that only about 1,500 got in 2017-2018. This is vs. 10,000 of majority students.

https://www.aamc.org/download/321474/data/factstablea9.pdf

So it’s easy to blame the minority students for the fact hat some majority students didn’t get in- but the reality is that it couldn’t be. There’s just not that many getting in, and those that are have the scores. I know because I’ve seen it and have been on both sides as an applicant and as an attending physician. I make this argument because I want ALL students to know they are needed, wanted and worthy of this profession. In spite of current events and the state of our world, health care involves a diverse array of patients, who need a diverse array of physicians. Everyone is needed. Race and gender do not determine whether someone can achieve excellence. It’s sad I have to say these things in 2018 but it bears repeating. All of us can and will succeed if we put our minds to our goals. Instead of thinking of things as a zero sum game: you win, I lose – think more inclusive and synergistic. You can learn so much and a different perspective from working along side people different from you. I encourage all of us in this community to bounce ideas off each other and to use this as a safe space to be ourselves and to learn.

 

I hope these premed myths have been helpful. Next time, I’ll touch on some aspects of medical practice and what it’s like being on your own.

Cheers,

Candice Williams MD

Premed Consultants

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