Premed Myths Part 1

Hello PREMEDS!!!! Application season is upon us. I saw a family friend and they asked me a series of questions that let me know many myths exist about being premed. I’m working to dispel a few. This is the purpose of this blog.

I will start with a few myths that are important to debunk.

 

1. You have to attend a college with a medical school to have a better chance at admission.

This is patently false. Admissions to medical school is competitive no matter where you attend for undergrad. Perhaps by some associations and premed societies you could meet medical school admissions staff and form connections. With some effort, this can be done regardless of your college of choice. I recommend attending a college that matches your interest and will give you the greatest number of options to explore not only sciences, but other subjects as well. There are combined colleges and medical school programs and these are limited and only few exist in the country. I recommend that a student really do their homework with shadowing physicians, being mentored and being certain of their career choice prior to embarking on something like this. Burnout is a reality and it takes a lot to commit to a path so early. For some though, these programs do prove to be the best choice.

https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/article/medical-schools-offering-combined-undergraduatemd-/

2. If you have a high GPA as a high school student, this means you will get into medical school.

Achievement at the high school level sadly doesn’t always translate to the college level. Suddenly you go from the best in your class to the middle of the pack. Don’t despair. This is a normal phenomenon of college life. It takes perseverance and hard work to adjust to university life. It takes even more to pursue the path to medicine. You won’t be a shoe in because you have a 4.5 GPA now as a high school senior. It takes more than just grades to be ready for medical education and it takes a body of work, achievement and a demonstration that you’ve done your homework to know you really want this path.

Admissions committees see many applications. What will make yours stand out? How are you unique? These questions are important to consider when planning the activities you participate in, your shadowing or volunteer experiences and pursuing your passions and hobbies. All of these facets including the MCAT and your ability to effectively communicate these things in writing have an influence on your application.

These are just two myths that I’ve heard as of lately that I thought it important to address. In part two, I will address if you need to be a “premed” major to get into medical school and other myths about this process. My goal is to lay things out for you so you don’t have to sift through so much information out there. Please ask any questions you like, either here or in the forum.

Keep striving towards your goals!

Candice Williams MD

Premed Consultants

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